Everything that’s Flappy isn’t always gold

Welcome back. If your week was anything like mine then I share your joy of experiencing this Friday as the start of the weekend.

For me, weekend is game development time. I spend pretty much all my free time working on games to get this going. That makes a “no” a bitter pill to swallow. Even if you expected a “no” in the first place. As you are no doubt aware, I submitted Clappy Bird to Amazon and to Apple.

I was surprised that Amazon provides feedback as quickly as they do. I submitted it last week Saturday to them and come Sunday morning I had a lovely letter informing me that I’ve used artwork from Flappy Bird. This was of course not true, I had drawn all my art work myself but I cannot deny that it was drawn to the same purpose as Flappy Bird and it looks very, very similar. In addition, Clappy Bird is no doubt a clone of Flappy Bird. I replied to the rejection and was simply told that I am using the Flappy Bird icon, which again I wasn’t.

I decided to leave it at that and to see what Apple came back with. It had taken Apple a little more than the average of 6 days (I think) but I finally received the loveliest and most politically correct response from them. They made no claims towards copyright or me using Flappy Bird graphics, rather, they indicated that they don’t approve games that leverage of other games. Fair enough I suppose and to be brutally honest, I appreciate that. Like I said in my previous post, the original creator of a game should reap the rewards of it, not the copy cats.

The interesting thing here was still the fact that Flappy Bird was removed and no longer available. Obviously, the counter argument is that the creator could opt to re-submit it at any time.

Regardless of the “no” I am extremely happy to have submitted something and seen some of the process flow. I’m also very encouraged by the fact that they won’t simply allow Flappy Bird clones. It does beg a few questions though, such as why say no to clones now and only with regards to Flappy Bird? They said no to me, but Fallout Boy is about to release a clone. What makes their clone special?

Why did Apple not prevent all the clones for 5-0 Radio for example, in fact, the creator of 5-0 radio, Allen Wong, has famously stated that there were so many clones he ended up creating clones for his own app to compete with himself and the clones. He still bought a¬†Lamborghini Aventador, so I suppose he won’t complain.

In all, I’m still satisfied that what’s fair is fair. I took a shot with Clappy Bird and they said no. It’s their right to say no and that no protects me too.